Law school mourns passing of two legal leaders
Public Relations - Published: August 18, 2014
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Widener Law is mourning the loss of two pillars of the Delaware legal community, who were dear friends of our school.

Both retired Delaware Supreme Court Justice and long-time adjunct professor Joseph T. Walsh and Stuart B. Young, whose family name is reflected in the law school’s most prestigious Fellowship, died Friday, Aug. 15.

“As an institution we have been fortunate to have had the support and encouragement of these two great men. Our students benefitted – and continue to benefit – from the commitments they made to the law school through their time, their wisdom and their boundless energies,” Interim Dean Erin Daly said.

Justice Walsh volunteered as a judge for countless moot court competitions, including as a regular member of the final bench for our Ruby R. Vale Interschool Corporate Moot Court Competition. His presence contributed to the growth of that competition into a nationally recognized event. He was a member of the school’s Board of Overseers and was the Delaware commencement speaker at the May 1997 ceremony, where he was given an honorary Doctor of Laws degree.

Perhaps Justice Walsh’s biggest impact was in the classroom, where he shared his vast knowledge of Delaware corporate law with his students. He was a member of the adjunct faculty teaching for 43 semesters over 23 years, including two classes this spring. He joined his students in the Ruby R. Vale Moot Courtroom this April to watch the Delaware Supreme Court conduct oral arguments during its annual visit to campus, and he received public acknowledgement from the justices for his ongoing commitment to the court.

Stuart Young was a member of the Young family whose foundation funds Widener’s H. Albert Young Fellowship in Constitutional Law. The fellowship allows a professor to conduct and publish research in the area of Delaware or U.S. constitutional law. The current fellow, Professor David R. Hodas, is the eighth since the position was endowed in 1998.

Young was a partner in the Young Conaway Stargatt & Taylor, LLP law firm and was a leader in the Delaware arts community. He, along with his wife Toni, sister Ronell Douglass, and brother H. Alan Young, and their spouses, have regularly attended the law school’s biennial H. Albert Young Lecture in Constitutional Law. He was an enthusiastic supporter of Widener faculty and their scholarship.

Young and his family endowed the Widener fellowship to honor the memory of their father, the late H. Albert Young, a highly respected lawyer and former Delaware attorney general known for his unwavering dedication to upholding justice even in unpopular cases.

The School of Law sends its sincerest condolences to the relatives of these two great men. Each one helped enrich the intellectual life of our school. We considered them part of our Widener Law family and will miss them.