Widener Law celebrates national recognition for Delaware Supreme Court Justice and Adjunct Professor Randy J. Holland
Public Relations - Published: August 28, 2014
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The School of Law congratulates long-time adjunct professor and Delaware Supreme Court Justice Randy J. Holland on receiving the prestigious Lewis F. Powell Award for Professionalism and Ethics.

Holland and Adjunct Professor Ryan Cicoski, who graduated magna cum laude from the law school in 2010, will both be honored at The American Inns of Court Celebration of Excellence on Oct. 25 at the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington. Cicoski will be recognized for his role as a 2014 Pegasus Scholar.

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg will host the event. Retired Justice Sandra Day O’Connor wrote a letter in support of Justice Holland’s nomination to the American Inns of Court. Based in Virginia, the organization fosters excellence in professionalism, ethics, civility and legal skills, and its membership includes more than 30,000 federal, state, and local judges, along with lawyers, law professors and law students.

The Lewis F. Powell Award for Professionalism and Ethics is awarded each year to a lawyer or judge who has rendered exemplary service in the areas of legal excellence, professionalism and ethics. Previous recipients have included Supreme Court Justice Anthony M. Kennedy and former Delaware Chief Justice E. Norman Veasey, who will attend the October program as a guest of Holland.

“It’s just a remarkable award,” said American Inns of Court spokeswoman Cindy Dennis.

“There is no one more deserving of this recognition than Justice Holland,” added Erin Daly, interim dean of Widener Law Delaware. “Widener Law students are fortunate to have firsthand knowledge of Justice Holland’s deep commitment to professionalism, his ethical standards and his keen legal intellect. And he does it all with a kind demeanor and a respect for everyone around him. He is a role model for our students, both in and out of the classroom.”

Holland is teaching a seminar on appellate practice and procedure this fall. He began teaching at the law school in the fall of 1991 and has also taught for Widener’s summer program in Venice, Italy. He regularly serves as a judge of student competitions, including on the final-round bench of Widener’s nationally recognized Ruby R. Vale Interschool Corporate Moot Court Competition. Each fall and spring semester he convenes a special session of the Delaware Supreme Court at the law school to swear Widener clinic students into the bar for the limited practice of law. He served as the Delaware commencement speaker in 2001, when he was presented with an honorary degree.

Long active in the American Inns of Court, Holland is the past national president. He is a founding member of the Terry-Carey American Inn of Court, which gives a professionalism award in his name. He is current co-chair of the National Advisory Committee to the American Judicature Society’s Center for Judicial Conduct. He chaired the American Bar Association National Joint Committee on Lawyer Regulation. Holland has also served on the ABA Presidential Commission on Fair and Impartial Courts, the Standing Committee on Client Protection and the Judicial Division’s Ethics and Professionalism Committee. For more than two decades, he has chaired the Delaware Judges’ Code of Conduct Revision Committee and, in that capacity, was instrumental in establishing the Delaware Judges’ Ethics Advisory Committee.

Holland has been recognized as one of the top 100 persons who influence business ethics in the United States. He has traveled internationally to advance professionalism and judicial ethics, working closely with the chief justice of Taiwan and visiting there numerous times to speak on these topics to government officials, lawyers, judges, and law students. With his encouragement, Taiwan adopted the American Bar Association’s Model Code of Judicial Conduct. Holland gave the annual COMBAR Lecture at Gray’s Inn in England and addressed the differences between the ethical obligations of an attorney in the European Union and the United States for protecting a client’s confidential communications. He also recently chaired a program on professionalism at the Qatar International Rule of Law Forum. Holland is an honorary Master of the Bench of Lincoln’s Inn in London, sharing that distinction with two other Americans: Ginsburg and her fellow Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens.

He has written, co-authored or edited eight books and is currently editing a book for the Library of Congress about the Magna Carta that Thomson-Reuters will publish in November.

Cicoski will be recognized at the Washington event for his role as a 2014 American Inns of Court Pegasus Scholar. The program is an exchange that brings young English barristers to the United States for six weeks to learn about the American legal system, and young American Inn of Court members to London for six weeks to learn about the English legal system. He traveled to London in March as one of only two U.S. attorneys selected for the program.

“Pegasus Scholars stand at the intersection of American and English law, and are offered a unique opportunity to explore the differences and similarities between both legal systems,” Cicoski has said. “The Pegasus Scholarship is the opportunity of a lifetime.”

Cicoski teaches advanced analytical applications to Delaware students this fall. He has been a member of the adjunct faculty since the fall of 2013.

While in law school, Cicoski served as a research editor for the Widener Law Review and was a Josiah Oliver Wolcott Fellow. He is an associate attorney at Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice, LLP in Wilmington, where he represents clients in a variety of corporate and business litigation, ranging from commercial contract disputes to state-court dissolution proceedings. He is on the board of directors of the Delaware Bar Foundation and the National Advisory Council of the American Judicature Society.

“We congratulate Ryan on his experience as a Pegasus Scholar,” Daly said. “It is exciting to see him being recognized for international leadership this early in his career.”