LL.M. Bridge Program Course Descriptions

FALL I (12 credit hours)

LBR 110: LEGAL WRITING & RESEARCH I (3 credit hours)
This course is the first part of a two-part legal writing course and a pre-requisite for LBR 210. This course is devoted to the basics of common law, legal reasoning and analytical legal writing. This course is designed to strengthen the student’s knowledge of English through didactic assignments focusing on grammar, sentence structure and legal writing skills to improve the student’s ability to communicate English within the American legal system.

LBR 111: INTRODUCTION TO LEGAL ANALYSIS (3 credit hours)
This course introduces the principles of effective legal analysis through proper technique and application of legal writing rules. Students will strengthen skills in legal citations, grammar, prose style and clarity. This course will also provide the fundamental knowledge of law in the basic areas of American legal practice, as well as present informative and practical information on today’s rigorous legal writing standards through weekly drafting assignments.

LBR 120: INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN LAW (3 credits)
This course will examine the principles that govern American Law and allow the student the opportunity to improve individual writing skills through didactic assignments. Emphasis will be placed on American contracts, tort and common law through class projects and practical drafting experiences. The student will gain insight into United States common law system through the study of intentional and unintentional torts, sources of contract law, elements of enforceable contracts, property law, common law defenses, and civil and common law traditions.

LBR 130: INTRODUCTION TO THE AMERICAN LEGAL SYSTEM (3 credits)
This course is designed as an introduction into the American legal system through the study of the United States Constitution, government and the court systems. This course provides students with an introduction to the legal system of the United States, including federal and state court structures, sources of law (constitutional law, statutory law, administrative law, and case law) and an exploration of legislative, judicial, and administrative agency processes. Introductory legal research tasks will be performed. This course will also provide an overview of civil and criminal procedure and will provide the student with an understanding of the United States legal structure and governmental influences to prepare the student for LLM coursework.

SPRING I (12 credit hours)

LBR 210: LEGAL WRITING & RESEARCH II (3 credits)
A closely supervised program in legal problem solving designed to develop research techniques, writing skills and training in legal advocacy. This course will have a strong emphasis on improving the student’s legal analysis and writing skills through didactic written assignments and case analysis to strengthen legal research and legal reasoning skills.

LBR 211: PERSUASIVE LEGAL WRITING (3 credits)
Designed to strengthen legal writing skills, this course will differentiate objective and persuasive legal writing through the examination and preparation of legal documents. During this course students will discuss issues of form, drafting supportive documents, accuracy and organization in both favorable and unfavorable legal case scenarios. Students will also be introduced to organizing arguments for factor and circumstance totality rules as well as ethical writing standards in client advocacy.

LBR 220: INTRODUCTION TO UNITED STATES CORPORATE LAW (3 credits)
The course will offer a general introduction into Corporate Law and other laws governing U.S. corporations. The focus will be on corporate directors, officers & shareholders, negotiable instruments, equity, negotiable instruments, mergers and acquisitions, the Uniform Commercial Code, General Corporate Law and selected securities law through case review, didactic evaluations and written assignments. This course will introduce the student to concepts studied in the LL.M. program.

LBR 230: INTRODUCTION TO UNITED STATES CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (3 credits)
The United States Constitution as a source of law is explored through various approaches to interpretation by the Supreme Court and the role of the courts in a constitutional democracy. Students will follow this source of law through decisions of the United Sates Supreme Court and examine foundational theories of government and individual rights from historical and contemporary perspectives.